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2015 Water System Plan

Water flows from the tap into a glass.Bellevue's water system plan, adopted in 2006, is being updated this year, providing an opportunity to:

  • Revisit water system operating policies and customer levels of service;
  • Evaluate system vulnerabilities and emergency preparedness; and
  • Examine what the water system will need over the next 20 years to meet anticipated population and employment growth, changing water regulations and to maintain customer service levels.

Why are we updating the plan?
Bellevue’s water utility supports the city’s public health and safety, quality neighborhoods, a healthy and sustainable environment and economy by providing a reliable source of safe, high-quality drinking water that meets all of the community’s water needs in an environmentally responsible manner.

Since the most recent plan was prepared in 2006, Bellevue’s population and employment base has grown significantly. Water consumption patterns have changed and continue to change. Water pipes and other facilities have continued to age. Each of these factors affects Bellevue’s ability to reliably deliver clean drinking water to our customers.

Why now?
The 2006 Water Comprehensive Plan was adopted by the City Council and approved by the state Department of Health in 2008. State law (WAC 246-290-100) mandates that water plans for Class A water systems be updated every six years. 

What goes into the water plan update?
The plan update will have several major components:

  • Review of water system operating policies (can be found in current plan);
  • Review  of population and employment growth and water consumption trends;
  • Water demand forecasting based on population projections and per capita usage;
  • Update of the computer hydraulic model, including significant field calibration  involving flow tests at fire hydrants;
  • Evaluation of system hydraulic capacity, vulnerability, levels of service and plan to accommodate anticipated growth;
  • Assessment of existing system condition and plan for maintenance, renewal and replacement;
  • Development of recommendations for system or programmatic improvements to meet projected needs.

Get involved

  • Attend staff project/status briefings at Environment Services Commission meetings throughout the year (third Thursday each month);
  • Contact project manager Doug Lane with specific questions or ideas.  dlane@bellevuewa.gov, or 425-452-6865; and/or
  • Suggest effective outreach techniques the city could use as the project moves forward.
Contact Information

Utilities
450 110th Ave. NE
Bellevue, WA 98009
Contact: Doug Lane
Phone: 425-452-6865
E-mail: dlane@bellevuewa.gov


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